Windows 10 hates new motherboards!

Alright, so quite a few people know that any Windows 7 or newer user can upgrade to Windows 10 for free. This has been true since mid-July of 2015 and it will remain true until mid July of next year. This isn’t just true for computers and laptops either. This is also the case, right now, for tablets. Microsoft has also announced that some smart phones will also be able to upgrade to Win 10 as well. If you have not yet upgraded, I personally recommend waiting a few more months. Many of the bugs have been worked out, but I’ve personally come across a few that have been inconvenient.

So what does any of this have to do with Windows 10 hating on new motherboards? Not too much, but it is kinda cool to know. I understand that most people out there aren’t the kind of people who do their own upgrades. This isn’t a bad thing, and it really isn’t even a matter of whether or not most people can do their own upgrades. For the most part it is as straight-forward as following the instructions and being extra careful. Most people don’t have time to mess with it themselves, however, and elect to go with pre-built systems. There’s nothing wrong with going to a website, telling a computer company what you want in a system, having that company build your system and ship it to you. If you are the kind of person who either prefers to build it themselves to keep costs down, or even so you can buy it one awesome piece at a time and assemble it as you can, then you need to know that Windows 10 can give you trouble.

As it stands, once you have installed it on your hard drive and started it for the first time, Win 10 is more or less set on that motherboard and CPU. I recently updated my motherboard (and processor, in for a penny and all that) you see and I got a bit of a shock when I turned my system back on. You see, 10 deactivated itself as soon as it detected the motherboard. I wasn’t the only person to find this little problem and it isn’t fun to fix. In fact, fixing the problem required (essentially) replacing the entire OS! Since it is still within the first year, I downgraded back to Windows 7 and called the number to reactivate my copy. When I did that, however, I lost every single thing I’d done since I installed 10, with the exception of the work which I backed up. I subscribe to the 3, 2, 1 method, it’s worth looking up. Since it has been less than a year since release, I’m able to upgrade back to 10 at any time, and yet I’d just been burned a little. I wanted to make sure this new motherboard and processor were going to work out before I re-upgraded.

So, it’s been a little bit since all of this happened, why bring it up now? Well, the truth is that the research I did hadn’t turned up anything specific until I specifically looked for problems. Maybe someone else out there with the same problem will read this and find a better way than I did. This week I reinstalled 10 and I’ve only had a few glitches. I’m cautiously optimistic, but I stand by what I said earlier. If you use Win 7 and are thinking about upgrading, I’d hold off for a bit. If, alas, you are one of those poor souls like my Erin was, stuck using Win 8.1 for what felt like all eternity, I recommend upgrading as fast as humanly possible. You don’t deserve what Microsoft has done to you my friends, 10 will be a good thing! As an old friend is known to say, stay golden my friends.

Advertisements